More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

More pictures from our drive through Clyde last weekend. 

Reblog cape sable island my photos thanksgiving weekend nova scotia fall

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

We took a drive last weekend through Clyde. 

1 note Reblog cape sable island my photos thanksgiving weekend nova scotia fall

What I’ve Read Lately: Vacation(s) Edition

Popular by Maya van Wagenen

If I were as into the ’50s and ’60s in high school as I am now, I think I would’ve liked to have tried Maya’s experiment: live for a year using the guidelines of a ’50s popularity manual. Maya tried it for a year in junior high and the results were wonderful for her confidence. 

The writing’s a little juvenile in places but that’s to be expected from a teenage author. (I’m not bitterly jealous or anything…)

The Wife, The Maid, and the Mistress by Ariel Lawhon

I love a good mystery and I love a good story set in 1930s New York City and this book is absolutely perfect. I hope someone bought the movie rights to this because it’d make one superb, Oscar-worthy movie. 

Rich with detail and a mystery that left me guessing until the very end, this is going on my must-recommend list. 

The Gils at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

This is a re-imagining of the 12 Dancing Princesses fairytale (which I’ve never heard of or read) set in the ’20s and featuring 12 sisters who all love to dance but have to sneak out to speakeasies because their controlling and well-connected father locks them in the house, irate that he never had a male heir to take over the business one day. 

I found the story quite fast-paced and it was a little difficult to keep up with all 12 sisters — they all have different personalities and backstories — after a certain point, but it was definitely an entertaining read. 

Someday My Prince Will Come by Jerramy Fine

Jerramy Fine is the royally-obsessed woman I wish I had the guts to be, although she loses me on the past-life stuff about how she and Peter Phillips (Princess Anne’s son) were true loves who were destined to reunite. Also with the moving to London for “university” and maxing out all of her credit cards, living with skeezoids, making a fool out of herself, etc., etc., etc.

Props to her for following her dream though. This was an entertaining read. 

The Diana Chronicles by Tina Brown

I generally take everything I read about Diana with a grain of salt — what do we truly know about her anyways? 

I’m not sure how reliable of a narrator Tina Brown is, considering she wrote a cover story for Newsweek about what Diana would be doing if she were alive to celebrate her 50th birthday (Facebook friends with Camilla and Charles? Not a big fan of Kate?), but it was engrossing and I felt like a learned a lot of things that I didn’t know about Diana by reading it. 

Citizen Keane: The Big Lies Behind the Big Eyes by Cletus Nelson

I read this in anticipation of the upcoming Big Eyes movie starring Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz (two of my favourites) as husband-and-wife painters in the ’60s. The husband, Walter Keane, takes credit for an art kitsch movement but it turns out the wife, Margaret Keane, has been painting them all along. 

This true story is so dramatic and twisted that it’s almost hard to believe it actually happened. It’s a quick read and one I’d definitely recommend. 

___

What books have you read lately? 

Reblog books am reading popular maya van wagenen the wife the maid and the mistress ariel lawhon the girls at the kingfisher club genevieve valentine someday my prince will come jerramy fine the diana chronicles princess diana tina brown citizen keane big eyes

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The more I’m discovering about ’50s and ’60s culture the more I’m falling in love with Mid-Century Modern and Atomic Age designs. I’m actively seeking out golds and turquoises, Pyrex and Federal Glass, and starbursts and sputniks to fill out my collection. 

Here are a few* things I’m coveting on Etsy. 

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These ameoba sherry glasses

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This pink ’50s set

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This 1956 clock radio

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These awesome gold starburst highball glasses

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This awesome Pyrex carafe (even though I already have two in similar designs…)

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I’m intrigued by this TV salt and pepper shaker.

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These atomic Christmas ornament-patterned glasses

This chic salad bowl.

This Tiki salt and pepper shaker set.

This oil and vinegar cruet set

This gas station-themed salt and pepper shaker set

These atomic glasses.

These mod cocktail glasses

What are your collections? 

__

All images found on Etsy, click the description to go to the listings. 

*I use the word ‘few’ loosely.

Reblog from the desk of jess mid-century modern 1950s 1960s retro atomic

My Tiara Collection

One of the biggest draws for this whole monarchy obsession of mine is the jewels. I love it when the ladies are literally dripping in diamonds, sapphires, rubies…it doesn’t matter what kind of gem.

Here are the tiaras I would want for my hypothetical collection. And don’t even pretend like you haven’t thought of what tiaras you’d steal like to wear if you ever fell into royalty.  

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Cambridge Lover’s Knot Tiara

Owned by: the British Monarchy

This tiara is so iconic how could I not want it? I’m pretty sure I would never take it off, even though Diana complained about how heavy it was. My neck could develop those muscles over time.  

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Greek Emerald Parure Tiara

Owned by: the Greek Monarchy 

I have a thing for emeralds. To me, nothing screams elegance more than emeralds. Remember when Angelina Jolie wore all those emeralds to the Oscars a few years ago? She was my pick for best dressed that year. What I love about this emerald tiara is how opulent it looks. 

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Dutch Sapphire Tiara 

Owned by: the Dutch Monarchy

There are 665 diamonds in this tiara. It’s beautiful, it’s gothic, and it’s badass. 

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Prussian Diamond Tiara

Owned by: the Spanish Monarchy

I honestly don’t know what draws me to this tiara. Maybe it’s the Greek motifs? Whatever the reason, it’s beautiful. 

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Marie Feodorovna Sapphire Bandeau

Owned by: the British Monarchy

Of all the tiaras I’ve listed, if I had to narrow it down to only one, I’d grab the Marie Feodorovna Sapphire Bandeau without a second thought. I love the delicate design on the bandeau and that large, large sapphire. This tiara hasn’t been seen on any of the British royals in a long time, but I’m hoping that Kate’ll be the one to haul it out of whatever hatbox it’s hiding in (if I don’t get to it first…).

Fleur de Lys Tiara

Owned by: the Spanish Monarchy

When you look at this tiara, you think, BAM. Queen. This is a queen’s tiara. It’s large and glorious and it would probably break a weak woman’s neck but it’s so god damn glamorous. 

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Empress Josephine Emerald Tiara

Owned by: the Norwegian Monarchy

Easily my favourite royal love story is that of King Harald and Queen Sonja of Norway. She was a commoner, he was the only son of the king. They dated for nine years and he vowed to his father that unless he could marry Sonja he would never marry. 

Long story short, of all of Norway’s tiaras, this one’s my favourite. Again, it has to do with the emeralds and the complex neo-classical design. 

Diamond Foam Tiara 

Owned by: the Monegasque Royal Family

My biggest problem with Princess Charlene is that she so rarely takes advantage of tiara-wearing occasions. Attending a major event in Monaco? No tiara. Representing Monaco at a foreign royal wedding when every other woman is dripping with their most expensive jewels? No tiara. 

This tiara is so small and understated that Charlene could wear this without getting that tiara headache or worrying that the gems clash with her outfit. 

Ocean Tiara

Owned by: the Monegasque Royal Family 

Remember what I said about Charlene just now? Yeah, she wore this tiara as a necklace first. And then debuted it in its tiara form for a Hello! magazine cover spread. Girl needs to check her priorities. 

Anyways, this tiara is so flowing and has sweet origins: Prince Albert (Charlene’s husband) had this tiara made as a wedding gift and wanted it to evoke her past as a competitive swimmer, and the waves of the ocean. I think it’s such a neat idea for a tiara. 

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Rose Cut Diamond Bandeau

Owned by: the Dutch Monarchy

This is the tiniest tiara I’ve picked, and that’s because it’s so versatile. You could wear this anywhere and someone might possibly mistake it for a glam headband from Le Chateau. It’s elegant without being overstated. 

What tiaras would you take if you had the chance? 

All pictures found via Google Images

4 notes Reblog royals tiaras British monarchy spanish monarchy dutch monarchy norwegian monarchy greek monarchy from the desk of jess monaco

How I Spent My Summer

Working. Since the Tattoo takes place the first week of July, we’re rehearsing all June. Then hibernating most of July. But the Tattoo’s always fun — it’s crazy and hectic and so rewarding, not to mention all of the friendships you make every year. 

Drinks on Canada Day with the rest of the marketing team and the video team from the Tattoo. 

The best damn crepe ever at Bistro Le Coq, and the first patio session of the summer with dear old Liz. 

Catching up with an old friend from journalism school at Stillwell. 

Hanging out in the Public Gardens. 

Adding to my retro collection, one salt and pepper shaker set at a time.

Catching up with another old college friend at The Auction House.  

Riding a ferris wheel with the most adorable grandfather ever (not mine, but I’m adopting him). 

Evenings at Liz’s house. 

Natal Day fireworks from my balcony. 

Visiting Maitland, where my brother and his girlfriend have been living for the past year. We went to the Fundy Tidal Interpretative Centre in the baking heat and I got a lot of nice shots. 

Lots of reading. 

Lots of reading.

Lots. 

of.

reading.

Walking to the top of Citadel Hill. 

Baking Katharine Hepburn’s famous brownies (delish!)

Liz’s birthday dinner at 2 Doors Down. This PB&J cheesecake was delicious, even if it did come in a mason jar (I feel about mason jars the way others feel about all the horrors of mankind). 

Watching my brother’s acting debut (back off everyone, he’s taking me to the Oscars someday!).

Going to a ’50s diner with Mom. 

Drinks at The Bitter End with Lindsay. 

Going into a dessert coma at the Dough Ball. 

And, most importantly:

Playing

with

this

little

guy. 

How was your summer?

Reblog my photos halifax cape sable island maitland nova scotia doggus reading Halifax Public Gardens food cocktails restaurants retro

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 
I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 
I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 
And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 
For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 
It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 
___
All photos found via Google Image search. 

I saw Grace of Monaco tonight as part of the Atlantic Film Festival, and I really enjoyed it. 

I know it’s getting a lot of criticism — a lot valid — but I still thought it was good. It’s a highly fictionalized story of the events of 1962, when French President Charles de Galle tried to force Prince Rainier and Monaco to pay income taxes to France. At the same time, Hitchcock sent Grace a script for Marnie, hoping to lure her back to Hollywood. 

I’ll admit, when it was first announced that Nicole Kidman was going to play Grace Kelly I was highly sceptical. Aside from the fact that they’re both blonde and elegant, Nicole doesn’t really look like Grace. But then there were scenes where I could really see Grace instead of Nicole. 

And then there’s the accent. Try as she might, Nicole will never be able to get rid of that Australian accent completely. Sometimes she spoke with a slightly Australian accent, other times it sounded like she was trying out her Bewitched accent. Thing is, Grace Kelly worked hard to transform her nasally Philadelphia accent (I’ve never actually heard it and I don’t think she would’ve ever been recorded using it) into a refined mid-Atlantic accent, but Nicole never achieves it. 

For the fictionalized story it tells, I liked it. Nicole was the acting highlight, but it was a treat to see the woman who played Lily Potter in the Harry Potter movies as Princess Antoinette, Grace’s surprising rival (not fictionalized, unfortunately). As for the cinematography: it looked like a long perfume commercial, or maybe a Vogue photoshoot. It was really beautiful to look at, and the costumes were gorgeous — especially the Cartier-replicated Bains de Mer tiara and three-strand necklace that Grace once owned. 

It’s not going to win any awards, and it’s not going to go down as the most factual of biopics, but it’s a good story. 

___

All photos found via Google Image search. 

Reblog grace kelly princess grace grace of monaco movies film fest

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 
They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 
What are some other recipes I should try?

I decided to blend my love of Golden Hollywood and baked goods and used Katharine Hepburn’s apparently famous brownies recipe to make a delicious snack. 

They’re super easy to make, even for a rube like myself. They’re moist and chewy — almost more like a fudge than a brownie. 

What are some other recipes I should try?

5 notes Reblog my photos halifax baking i can cook brownies katharine hepburn

Things That Need to Happen on Sons of Anarchy This Season

It’s been a long, long, long, long, lonnnnnnnnnng ten months but Sons of Anarchy finally starts its seventh and final season tonight. If you’re like me, you’ve been heartbroken since last season ended and you’ve been impatiently waiting for this day to come. 

image

To prepare, here are some things that need to happen this season (and there are spoilers and I don’t care because you’ve had almost a year to catch up and I think it’s annoying that we whine about spoilers anyways.):

1. Gemma needs to die. Like a lot

Listen, if the series ends and Gemma isn’t punished for what she’s done — chief among them killing an innocent Tara — I’m going to riot in the streets. I was always willing to give Gemma the benefit of the doubt because she seemed to be operating from a place of love and blind loyalty, but she crossed a line last season. Even if she isn’t killed, as long as Jax knows what she did and makes her suffer for it I’ll be happy. 

2. Tig needs a happy ending.

Tig, for all his mettle, has been through the ringer in the last few seasons. From being chained feet away from his daughter being burned alive to believing that he’d been sold out and hand delivered to Damon Pope, SAMCRO has broken him. I want him to reconcile with Fawn, adopt a bunch of resue dogs, and ride off on his motorcycle into the sunset. He needs a happy ending. 

3. Chibs needs to stay alive, no matter what

Chibs, I don’t care what you have to do in order to stay alive just as long as you do it. You understand me? 

4. Jax needs to get the hell out

This seems the most unlikely at this point. Kurt Sutter’s been talking nontop about how, without his moral compass (Tara) to guide him, it’s all about revenge and retribution this season, I hope Jax comes to realize that he does need to get out of SAMCRO and out of Charming. Hand the gavel over to Bobby — who also is under strict orders to stay alive (you hear me, Bobby Elvis?) — like you’ve attempted to twice, pack up Abel and Thomas, and get them away from this life. 

5. Keep on keepin’ on, Happy

Guys, remember when the Chinese took Happy as collateral last year and then we didn’t see him again for the rest of that episode (until it cut to him at the end montage watching anime and eating Chinese food)? I was more worked up at that point than I had been all season. Sure, he’s a psychotic murderer, but he’s also wickedly weird and grotesquely lovable. I need him waving Jax off and offering up gruff advice as he promises Jax that SAMCRO’s going legit and not to worry any more. 

Other things that need to happen:

- Juicey, I’m sorry but I’ve given up on you. I was hoping you’d get out of the rat trap Jax had placed for you but now I’m waiting for him to find you. 

- Unser needs to put two and two together, if he hasn’t already, about Gemma killing Tara, and then he needs to go straight to Jax. I don’t care if you harbour feelings for her, Unser, she’s never going to return them. And if he’s caught keeping Gemma’s secrets, you can bet that when Jax puts it all together, he’ll send some vengence Unser’s way. 

- Venus. God, Venus, please stay forever. Move to Charming, set up a housewares store, and live happily ever after. 

Finally, to Kurt Sutter: please, I beg of you: no fade-to-black. No lingering questions that you’ll coyly avoid answering in interviews for years to come. No “draw your own conclusions.” No Tony Soprano is-he-dead-isn’t-he-dead speculating for years to come.

I trust you. Don’t make me lose that trust. 

What do you hope happens tonight?

___ 

I own none of these pictures, they were found via Google Image search.

3 notes Reblog sons of anarchy from the desk of jess here be spoilers

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.
Over the friggin’ moon. 
Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 
To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 
___
I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

I am over-the-moon excited that Kate’s expecting her second child, guys.

Over the friggin’ moon. 

Get ready for lots of discussion of maternity fashions, potential names, and excessive door-watching (once we get down to the wire). 

To celebrate the wonderful news, here are some of my favourite pictures from Kate’s last pregnancy. 

___

I own none of these images, but my God I’d love to be a royal photographer. 

16 notes Reblog duchess of cambridge duke and duchess of cambridge baby cambridge 2 kate middleton royal baby